No. 584
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
December 7, 2022

Hazing at the Stock Board

How the battering-ram process is applied by the bulls and bears to while away the idle hours of the dull season.
May 8, 2011
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Not George Talkington, but there must have been a strong resemblance.Many people could be called “accident prone,” but, fortunately, few take it to the level of the subject of today’s post.  From the “Bath Chronicle,” November 21, 1833 (via Newspapers.com):George Talkington, once a celebrated horse-dealer at Uttoxeter, who died on the 8th of April, 1826, at Cheadle, Cheshire, in his eighty-third
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Strange Company - 12/7/2022
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Wishing you a happy and bountiful Thanksgiving Day! Lizzie is thankful for turkey and all the trimmings – and no mutton broth in sight!
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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 11/22/2022
CAME NEAR LOSING HIS MONEYSan Francisco ChronicleMay 6, 1893(Click image to enlarge)  San Francisco Man Taken in by Denver Card Sharks "First time I ever got caught" (Soapy Smith) This post was originally supposed to be about a new "victim" (Charles Anderson) swindled by the soap gang that I recently uncovered during a search through newspaper archives, but in looking through my files I found
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 12/6/2022
On this date in 2002, Pakistani Mir Aimal Kansi, Kasi, or Qazi was executed by lethal injection in Virginia, U.S.A. “Real angry with the policy of the U.S. government in the Middle East, particularly toward the Palestinian people,”* Qazi on January 25, 1993 revenged himself on Central Intelligence Agency commuters queued for a left turn […]
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Executed Today - 11/14/2022
 When tried for the 1840 murder of Catherine Merry, Charles Cook pled innocent by reason of insanity. Despite a history of medical treatment for extreme melancholy, and strange behavior such as running through the streets of Schenectady, wearing nothing but a blanket, proclaiming himself to be the Savior of the world, the jury rejected his plea and found him guilty.Before his execution, Cook
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Murder By Gaslight - 12/3/2022
For years I’ve walked by the delightfully shabby Joe’s Tavern sign at the corner of Tenth Avenue and 25th Street. I’ve never seen the vintage vertical beauty lit up, unfortunately. Even stranger, I’ve never seen any sign of life inside 258 Tenth Avenue, which once housed what I imagine to have been an old-school neighborhood […]
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Ephemeral New York - 12/5/2022
An article I recently wrote for the British online magazine, New Politic, is now available online. The article, “The Criminal Origins of the United States of America,” is about British convict transportation to America, which took place between the years 1718 and 1775, and is the subject of my book, Bound with an Iron Chain: […]
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Early American Crime - 12/17/2021
Afloat on a Cake of Ice. | The Girls Biffed Each Other

Hazing at the Stock Board

Hazing at the Stock Board

New York, New York, April, 1884 - How the battering-ram process is applied by the bulls and bears to while away the idle hours of the dull season.

The members of the New York Stock Exchange are a frisky set, and as one who knows says: "Brokers will be boys." Their wild freaks would sometimes lead a stranger to believe that they were just fresh from college.

Mr. J. C. Carey, better known as "Crosstown Carey," who has been a member of the Exchange for twenty years, was lately the victim of a terrible hazing on the floor of the Board. His arm is very lame, his chest black and blue, and his ribs an object of solicitude to his physician-all the result of the rough treatment received in the Board Room the other day at the hands of the younger brokers. Their propensity for fun had been fully awakened by hazing Mr. H. D. Knowlton, on the occasion of his debut on the floor. This gentleman being young and prepared for the reception always given to a new member, escaped from the clutches of "the boys" after a few minutes, considerably the worse for wear. Just then the hazers caught sight of Mr. Carey's portly form, and, in a spirit of pure fun, they went for him.

It was in vain that he rushed to the water cooler and threw glassfuls of the icy beverage at the advancing foes; it did not damp the ardor of their pursuit. They drove the victim into a corner, and, forming a long line, shoulder to shoulder, they rushed upon him with the force of a catapult. Many of the younger members of the Exchange are trained athletes, and this line of men swaying to and fro, gave him a terrible pounding before he could escape. Horseplay is tolerated by the laws of the Exchange, but if a member strikes another on the floor he is punished with suspension; consequently the victim of an assault of this kind is at a disadvantage. Even if this law did not exist, however, he would hesitate to strike his tormentors, knowing that there is not a grain of malice in the attack.

 


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette - April 5, 1884